Communications Collective is proud to announce an exciting new partnership with Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA).

A key public art museum within Australia’s largest tertiary institution, MUMA is adventurous and forward-looking in its support of new art and ideas.

MUMA has a vision to become an international centre of excellence in the research and collection, promotion and presentation of contemporary visual art. The museum has engaged Communications Collective to drive its messaging and raise its brand profile. Communications Collective offers expert consultancy to the arts, design, architecture and lifestyle sectors.

“As a culturally aware, creatively inclined communications agency we are extremely pleased to be working with Monash University Museum of Art, which does so much to support a wider artistic conversation in Australia,” says Communications Collective director Genevieve Brannigan.

Communications Collective will be involved from MUMA’s second exhibition for 2017, Christian Thompson: Ritual Intimacy, which opens in April. This will be the first survey of the work of one of Australia’s leading Indigenous artists and will be accompanied by the publication of the first monograph on the artist’s practice.

The exhibition is curated by MUMA director Charlotte Day and Hetti Perkins. A long-time curatorial collaborator with Thompson, Perkins is the writer and presenter of art + soul, the ABC’s acclaimed television series about contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art.

Thompson, of the Bidjara people, works across photography, video, sculpture, performance and sound to explore notions of identity, race and Australia’s colonial history.

The artist has made history as one of the first two Aboriginal Australians to be accepted into Oxford University, where he completed his Doctorate of Philosophy (Fine Art) in 2015. Christian Thompson: Ritual Intimacy includes his series We Bury Our Own, which Thompson made in dialogue with images of Aboriginal people held in the collections of the Pitt Rivers Museum at Oxford.

Ritual Intimacy will also include Thompson’s best-known work in photography, where he has used his own image to present ideas about identity and the collision of cultures, along with his audio and video works that celebrate language and gesture through performance, sound and song.