It’s been a week of recognition for Melbourne based designer Pascale Gomes McNabb, who picked up major gongs at two separate Australian interior design awards nights in Sydney.

On May 19, Gomes McNabb won in the Hospitality category at the Australian Interior Design Awards for Penfolds Magill Estate Restaurant, South Australia. Held at The Ballroom, Hilton Sydney, a panel of eight prominent Australian commercial and interior designers, architects and sustainability advisors formed the jury, who in their commendations described how “beautiful lighting, sophisticated use of colour and a thoughtful composition of elements create a delightful and intriguing interior.”

Also praising the design’s attention to detail, ranging from custom furniture and lighting through to a “clear understanding on service and the role staff play within a hospitality interior”, the jury concluded the project was an interior “for any visitor to be seduced by”.

Set on one of the vineyards of the iconic Australian wine maker, Gomes McNabb was invited to reinvent the modernist glass pavilion that was home Magill Estate, the winery’s flagship restaurant. Her concept for the site combined the oenological notion of terroir with a reverence for Penfolds’ intrinsically Australian history, creating a dining environment that is complementary to and befitting of its distinctive setting and heritage.

On May 14, Pascale took out the Hospitality Design category in the Belle Coco Republic Interior Design Awards. The judging panel, comprising of Coco Republic Executive director Anthony Spon-Smith, Belle Magazine Editor-in-chief Neale Whitaker, interior designer and Yellowtrace blogger Dana Tomic-Hughes and New York-based designer Jonathan Adler, awarded the accolade to the modern French bistro Yellow, located in Sydney’s Potts Point

Inspired by the bistronomy movement that has liberated Paris and France, Yellow’s dining room pays homage to the building’s colourful 1970s history while maintaining warm yet contemporary edge. Delivered within an extremely tight timeframe, many elements were retained and reused, while others left in raw, ‘unfinished’ states. A combination of luxe and comfortable elements that offer juxtaposition with touches of decay and the imperfection, Yellow is understated and intimate, with elegant tones and interesting textures.